massage_therapist_3_womens_dark_tshirt-resized-600Staying in touch with old clients can be really difficult. But we know that reaching out them is a great way to remind them how much they enjoy getting a massage and that they need to book an appointment. Sometimes a call is a nice, personal touch, but a phone call can sometimes feel intrusive. Emailing your clients on a regular basis can be a great way to stay in touch and keep your clientele returning.

If you haven’t started asking your clients for their email address, start doing it now. You can download our intake form template to get started collecting the information you need for your clients. It wouldn’t hurt to ask your clients if texting, a phone call, or email as their preferred method of communication.

Choose a system.

Next, if you don’t have a system for sending out emails, start looking. There are plenty of free or inexpensive emailing systems. If you have fewer than 2,000 contacts, use MailChimp for free and send up to 12,000 emails a month.

Set up lists.

The best way to make sure your email never gets opened is by sending the same message to all of your clients. Take a little time to divide up your clients into groups that make sense for your practice. You could start by making a list for clients who haven’t seen you in years. Then work your way up to frequent regulars. You might want to divide up by demographics, like gender, or treatment specialties, like pain management. Whatever you do, you’ll want to segment your list so that you can do the next step which is…

Tailor your message.

If you have a lot of people to reach, it’s just not practical to write a personal note to each one of them, especially if you want to set up automated processes. If you’re using a service like MailChimp, you can at least insert tags to personalize the email. It’s so much nicer getting an email that says “Hey there, Sally” rather than “Hello client” or something generic. Once you’ve segmented your list, you can customize the message to fit that list. Speaking to all women? Tell them about your “Mom’s day out” special for Mother’s Day. Emailing a group that hasn’t been in to see you in awhile? Tell them you’ve missed them and you hope they’ll take advantage of your “Welcome back” special that you’re running.

Analyze.

Once you start getting into the rhythm of emailing your clients, don’t forget to check your analytics. This is why it’s important to use a decent emailing platform. The analytics can tell you what you’re doing right, and more importantly, what you’re doing wrong. Check your open rates, how many people are opening the email and clicking through to your website? You might even think about setting up a tracking phone number, so you can see who is following up via phone from your emails. You can start making adjustments to what day and time you send your emails, the subject lines, offers, and content. Use past successful email campaigns as models for future campaigns.

Experiment.

Try new things, new offers, different word choices and tones, send emails out at different times. See what works. Sometimes you’ll succeed, and other times you’ll fail. But if you keep experimenting with your message and your lists, you’ll find out what works and what doesn’t. Use that information to get better.

Email is still a powerful marketing tool, especially when you’re staying in touch with current and past clients.

Tell us about all the ways you use email to keep clients returning, or other tips you might have about ongoing communication with clients. We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

image credit: cafe press

 

Comments from original Massamio post:

Excellent blog. Definitely an area I need to improve in. Thank you for the helpful information. — Posted @ Monday, January 07, 2013 9:53 AM by Andrea Mouser

I barely have time to send one email per month to everyone, but I have a 50% open rate and I’m getting more click throughs now than before.  I use Constant Contact and find it is easy to use.  Thanks for the updated tips! — Posted @ Tuesday, January 08, 2013 11:07 AM by Janice Jackson